From the 1950s up until the early 1970s, it was normal for computer users to have the software freedoms associated with free software, which was typically public domain software.[11] Software was commonly shared by individuals who used computers and by hardware manufacturers who welcomed the fact that people were making software that made their hardware useful. Organizations of users and suppliers, for example, SHARE, were formed to facilitate exchange of software. As software was often written in an interpreted language such as BASIC, the source code was distributed to use these programs. Software was also shared and distributed as printed source code (Type-in program) in computer magazines (like Creative Computing, SoftSide, Compute!, Byte etc) and books, like the bestseller BASIC Computer Games.[25] By the early 1970s, the picture changed: software costs were dramatically increasing, a growing software industry was competing with the hardware manufacturer's bundled software products (free in that the cost was included in the hardware cost), leased machines required software support while providing no revenue for software, and some customers able to better meet their own needs did not want the costs of "free" software bundled with hardware product costs. In United States vs. IBM, filed January 17, 1969, the government charged that bundled software was anti-competitive.[26] While some software might always be free, there would henceforth be a growing amount of software produced primarily for sale. In the 1970s and early 1980s, the software industry began using technical measures (such as only distributing binary copies of computer programs) to prevent computer users from being able to study or adapt the software applications as they saw fit. In 1980, copyright law was extended to computer programs.

Fees are usually charged for distribution on compact discs and bootable USB drives, or for services of installing or maintaining the operation of free software. Development of large, commercially used free software is often funded by a combination of user donations, crowdfunding, corporate contributions, and tax money. The SELinux project at the United States National Security Agency is an example of a federally funded free software project.


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I don’t mind doing surveys as long as I know I have to do them up front don’t email me or text me and say I won something for you giving me a free gift card or sending me something free in the mail and then you ask for my credit card or did you order for me to get anything I have to do thousands of an answer a lots of questions and their personal questions I think that is so disrespectful and sneaky and scammy and it really shouldn’t even be able to be posted on the Internet or sent to anyone on over the online.if I have to fill out surveys or anything besides give you my information where to send my free merchandise then it’s not free it’s basically a trade in order for me to get the free merchandise I have to give you my time in answering a survey questions or excetera if that’s the case just be upfront and honest and say that don’t say it there’s no strings attached and that I won something and where you sending me something free because I’ve never get it.
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