Many people new to free software find themselves confused because the word "free" in the term "free software" is not used the way they expect. To them free means "at no cost". An English dictionary lists almost twenty different meanings for "free". Only one of them is "at no cost". The rest refer to liberty and lack of constraint. When we speak of Free Software, we mean freedom, not price.
Take Huckberry as an example. They team up with clothing retailers and sell exclusive versions of retailers' items on Huckberry's online store. For Huckberry, they are the single source where an interested shopper can purchase the made-for-Huckberry exclusive item. For the retailer, they get exposure to their brand while also having another online venue to find new customers. It's a win-win scenario that's a low-cost investment for the retailer.

Take Huckberry as an example. They team up with clothing retailers and sell exclusive versions of retailers' items on Huckberry's online store. For Huckberry, they are the single source where an interested shopper can purchase the made-for-Huckberry exclusive item. For the retailer, they get exposure to their brand while also having another online venue to find new customers. It's a win-win scenario that's a low-cost investment for the retailer.
There is debate over the security of free software in comparison to proprietary software, with a major issue being security through obscurity. A popular quantitative test in computer security is to use relative counting of known unpatched security flaws. Generally, users of this method advise avoiding products that lack fixes for known security flaws, at least until a fix is available.
Second, the term makes a lot of corporate types nervous. While this does not intrinsically bother me in the least, we now have a pragmatic interest in converting these people rather than thumbing our noses at them. There's now a chance we can make serious gains in the mainstream business world without compromising our ideals and commitment to technical excellence -- so it's time to reposition. We need a new and better label.
This last point, which allows the software to be sold for money seems to go against the whole idea of free software. It is actually one of its strengths. Since the license allows free redistribution, once one person gets a copy they can distribute it themselves. They can even try to sell it. In practice, it costs essentially no money to make electronic copies of software. Supply and demand will keep the cost down. If it is convenient for a large piece of software or an aggregate of software to be distributed by some media, such as CD, the vendor is free to charge what they like. If the profit margin is too high, however, new vendors will enter the market and competition will drive the price down. As a result, you can buy a Debian release on several CDs for just a few USD.
In 2006, OpenBSD started the first campaign against the use of binary blobs in kernels. Blobs are usually freely distributable device drivers for hardware from vendors that do not reveal driver source code to users or developers. This restricts the users' freedom effectively to modify the software and distribute modified versions. Also, since the blobs are undocumented and may have bugs, they pose a security risk to any operating system whose kernel includes them. The proclaimed aim of the campaign against blobs is to collect hardware documentation that allows developers to write free software drivers for that hardware, ultimately enabling all free operating systems to become or remain blob-free.
At first glance, appear.in looks a lot like GoToMeeting. That's because both of them use the fledgling open-source standard called WebRTC (real time communication) to set up and connect users for video conferencing in modern browsers (Chrome, Firefox, and Opera, specifically). There are a whole slew of companies trying it, with names like Talky, imo, and Gruveo—there's even a Web RTC feature built into the Firefox browser. Appear.in outdoes them all. It has mobile apps, allows up to eight conference attendees, screen sharing, claims on customizable "rooms," and even just simple chat tools. You can even stick an appear.in room on your website.
Standard and Poor's is one of the most prestigious companies in the world. If you are familiar with the U.S. stock market, then you know that the company publishes the S&P 500, an index of the 500 most promising large publicly-traded companies in various industries. Standard and Poor's also rates and provides indices for smaller companies. The company's reports focus on financial information and credit ratings and can be very useful in tracking down leads in the financial sector.
This company offers full-size, awesome samples. The only trick is that they only give away products at a certain time of the day. I have "won" a couple of samples by following one very important rule: fill out all of your information, answer all of the questions, and at the exact time the contest begins, hit "submit". Every second counts! To see promotional cosmetics samples Allure has to offer, visit their website. Some examples of previously available samples include:
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