Distribution of source code. One of the problems with most proprietary software is that you can't fix bugs or customize it since the source code is not available. Also, the company may decide to stop supporting the hardware you use. Many free licenses force the distribution of the source code. This protects the user by allowing them to customize the software for their needs.
The first of a few Piriform programs on this list, CCleaner—the first C is for Crap!—is one of the best, and pretty much essential for keeping a system going. What it does is simple: it cleans up extraneous files to keep a system running better. Get it and run it, regularly. It'll even delete some apps you didn't think you could get rid of—like those provided in Windows 10, whether you wanted them or not.
In 1983, Richard Stallman, one of the original authors of the popular Emacs program and a longtime member of the hacker community at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, announced the GNU project, the purpose of which was to produce a completely non-proprietary Unix-compatible operating system, saying that he had become frustrated with the shift in climate surrounding the computer world and its users. In his initial declaration of the project and its purpose, he specifically cited as a motivation his opposition to being asked to agree to non-disclosure agreements and restrictive licenses which prohibited the free sharing of potentially profitable in-development software, a prohibition directly contrary to the traditional hacker ethic. Software development for the GNU operating system began in January 1984, and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was founded in October 1985. He developed a free software definition and the concept of "copyleft", designed to ensure software freedom for all. Some non-software industries are beginning to use techniques similar to those used in free software development for their research and development process; scientists, for example, are looking towards more open development processes, and hardware such as microchips are beginning to be developed with specifications released under copyleft licenses (see the OpenCores project, for instance). Creative Commons and the free culture movement have also been largely influenced by the free software movement.
It's not super popular in the US and not even our favorite messaging app, but you can't ignore the 800-pound messaging gorilla that is WhatsApp—since it was purchased by Facebook for almost $20 billion and it has over a billion users worldwide. It offers end-to-end encryption, has animated GIF support, group chat for up to 256 people, document sharing, voice and video calls, one-tap voice messages, and a Web-based interface you access by scanning a QR code with the app on your mobile device. It recently added macOS and Windows desktop versions.
The freedom to run the program means the freedom for any kind of person or organization to use it on any kind of computer system, for any kind of overall job and purpose, without being required to communicate about it with the developer or any other specific entity. In this freedom, it is the user's purpose that matters, not the developer's purpose; you as a user are free to run the program for your purposes, and if you distribute it to someone else, she is then free to run it for her purposes, but you are not entitled to impose your purposes on her.
Vuze, which integrates torrent uploads/downloads with a media server option, comes in two flavors now. The free Leap is lightweight, has no ads, but lacks a Linux version. The regular free Vuze is ad-supported, but has lots more features like remote control via the web or mobile apps. It's nice software but watch the installations—even the Web page will itself will try to get you to install a new search engine. Twice.
Actively search for people and businesses who might benefit from your services. Check out their website, get ahold of their contact information, and start cold calling to generate leads. Few freelancers use this direct strategy anymore, and people will be surprised by your professionalism in choosing to cold call. This will help you stand out from the competition.

While most hard-copy business directories are located in the Reference section of the public library, you should still ask your Reference librarian which databases they carry and where to find them. If your local library doesn't have the directory you need, then place a request with the librarian because very often the librarian will be able to subscribe to the source you're looking for. Many libraries have computers set up so that patrons like you can go online if you prefer the electronic version. That said, not all of these databases have been converted to e-versions. 
Note: In February 1998 a group moved to replace the term "Free Software" with "Open Source Software". This terminology debate reflects underlying philosophical differences, but the practical requirements placed on software licenses, and the discussion in the rest of this page, are essentially the same for both Free Software and Open Source Software.
Would you like to design labels right on your screen without installing software? Then what you need is HERMA LabelAssistant online (EAO). Choose from more than 100 different templates. Or design your labels from scratch, with your own images, logos and graphics. Integrate Excel spreadsheets for mail merge. Or use EAO to generate barcodes and serial numbers. This is the state of the art in label design.
Got a slew of CBR and CBZ files laying around on your hard drive unread? These compressed files full of scanned-in comic book page images are easy to read with the right software. The right software is ComicRack, because it does a lot more than just display the images—it'll even share the files across your network, and provides full database organization of the comics. Use the Windows version to sync comics to the mobile apps.
At first glance, this looks like Dropbox or OneDrive, but Resilio Sync (formerly BitTorrent Sync) skips one aspect—it syncs file between computers without the files ever hitting a server on the Internet for online storage. This is purely peer-to-peer syncing, and works great with large files. For free, you get syncing between two devices but with unlimited data.
Email list building can be a drag, unless you use lead magnets. These are free offers of valuable content that you give away in exchange for someone’s contact information. This can be free guide, PDF, template, coupon or free consultation, to name a few examples. Just make sure it’s something your target audience would really value and benefit from.
And, we should explain publicly the reason for the change. Linus Torvalds has been saying in "World Domination 101" that the open-source culture needs to make a serious effort to take the desktop and engage the corporate mainstream. Of course he's right -- and this re-labeling, as Linus agrees, is part of the process. It says we're willing to work with and co-opt the market for our own purposes, rather than remaining stuck in a marginal, adversarial position.
Guest blog on other sites that have a big audience to broaden your brand reach even further. You can usually get a byline and link back to your site. All you have to do is search Google for guest post opportunities. Use “[niche keyword]+ write for us” or “[niche keyword]+ contributor guidelines” for starters. Just make sure the site you pitch to has an audience that will be interested in your business.
Rules about how to package a modified version are acceptable, if they don't substantively limit your freedom to release modified versions, or your freedom to make and use modified versions privately. Thus, it is acceptable for the license to require that you change the name of the modified version, remove a logo, or identify your modifications as yours. As long as these requirements are not so burdensome that they effectively hamper you from releasing your changes, they are acceptable; you're already making other changes to the program, so you won't have trouble making a few more.
It's not super popular in the US and not even our favorite messaging app, but you can't ignore the 800-pound messaging gorilla that is WhatsApp—since it was purchased by Facebook for almost $20 billion and it has over a billion users worldwide. It offers end-to-end encryption, has animated GIF support, group chat for up to 256 people, document sharing, voice and video calls, one-tap voice messages, and a Web-based interface you access by scanning a QR code with the app on your mobile device. It recently added macOS and Windows desktop versions.
The BSD-based operating systems, such as FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and NetBSD, do not have their own formal definitions of free software. Users of these systems generally find the same set of software to be acceptable, but sometimes see copyleft as restrictive. They generally advocate permissive free software licenses, which allow others to use the software as they wish, without being legally forced to provide the source code. Their view is that this permissive approach is more free. The Kerberos, X11, and Apache software licenses are substantially similar in intent and implementation.

Engaging with Hashtags: Pretty much every social media site uses hashtags. You can connect with like-minded strangers and even find high-quality prospects by using the right hashtags in your posts and engaging with others who’ve used hashtags in their posts. For example, if you sell homes, the hashtag #realestate is full of leads and prospects when you search it. 


Freeflys: Another strong contender in the freebies space, Freeflys has appeared on NBC’s Today Show, The Doctors, Fox News and a handful of other media outlets. Similar to most of these sites, Freeflys utilizes email alerts to tell users about free-sample offers as they happen. The site also allows you to search for a specific product with the handy search bar.
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