Gale is an e-research tool offered by Cengage Learning. It's designed mainly for schools and educational research, but can be quite helpful in generating sales lead lists as well. Gale publishes over 600 databases, both in hard copy and online. These databases include both business information and collections of articles on various subjects. The article lists are particularly useful when you're collecting lists of publications related to your industry.
This online lead service allows you to search for both businesses and consumers. The business search options include the type of the business, the size of the business, the SIC code, the business location, and more. The consumer search options include income, age range, location, and so on. Lead list generation requires you (or the library) to have a paid account, but the basic lookup service is free.
How you work to generate new leads for your business is up to you. You can use lead management and lead generation software to help you reach new prospects, you can work to improve your marketing efforts by yourself, or you can take an entirely different route: you could pay for new leads. Buying leads is actually a thing. You can pay for the contact information and related data of interested individuals that may hold potential for investing in your company. It sounds like cheating, but it could be an easy way to gain new potential customers.
It's not super popular in the US and not even our favorite messaging app, but you can't ignore the 800-pound messaging gorilla that is WhatsApp—since it was purchased by Facebook for almost $20 billion and it has over a billion users worldwide. It offers end-to-end encryption, has animated GIF support, group chat for up to 256 people, document sharing, voice and video calls, one-tap voice messages, and a Web-based interface you access by scanning a QR code with the app on your mobile device. It recently added macOS and Windows desktop versions.
The freedom to redistribute copies must include binary or executable forms of the program, as well as source code, for both modified and unmodified versions. (Distributing programs in runnable form is necessary for conveniently installable free operating systems.) It is OK if there is no way to produce a binary or executable form for a certain program (since some languages don't support that feature), but you must have the freedom to redistribute such forms should you find or develop a way to make them.
Engaging with Hashtags: Pretty much every social media site uses hashtags. You can connect with like-minded strangers and even find high-quality prospects by using the right hashtags in your posts and engaging with others who’ve used hashtags in their posts. For example, if you sell homes, the hashtag #realestate is full of leads and prospects when you search it. 
While most hard-copy business directories are located in the Reference section of the public library, you should still ask your Reference librarian which databases they carry and where to find them. If your local library doesn't have the directory you need, then place a request with the librarian because very often the librarian will be able to subscribe to the source you're looking for. Many libraries have computers set up so that patrons like you can go online if you prefer the electronic version. That said, not all of these databases have been converted to e-versions. 
Ubuntu updates yearly, once majorly and once with just fixes. But each iteration brings new tools and developments. Last year the Linux distro even made the leap to tablets; that after trying to power smartphones in 2015. The latest version for desktops and laptops comes with a full suite of software (including LibreOffice), access to thousands more (and many free—just look for the penguin icon throughout this story). It's the Linux of choice here at PCMag, for it's one that is easy to master by just about any user.

It's not super popular in the US and not even our favorite messaging app, but you can't ignore the 800-pound messaging gorilla that is WhatsApp—since it was purchased by Facebook for almost $20 billion and it has over a billion users worldwide. It offers end-to-end encryption, has animated GIF support, group chat for up to 256 people, document sharing, voice and video calls, one-tap voice messages, and a Web-based interface you access by scanning a QR code with the app on your mobile device. It recently added macOS and Windows desktop versions.
The expansion of online marketing with regards to promotional giveaways has facilitated the rise of "Freebie sites" that seek to aggregate all promotional free sample offers in one place. These sites will often compile free product samples from all over the World Wide Web and categorize them by type. Some product sample offers may require consumers to complete a survey or refer a friend in order to qualify for the freebies. When all requirements are fulfilled, the product samples are shipped to the consumer. Some sample products might be digital goods, where sample might be closely related to a product trial.

The freedom to run the program means the freedom for any kind of person or organization to use it on any kind of computer system, for any kind of overall job and purpose, without being required to communicate about it with the developer or any other specific entity. In this freedom, it is the user's purpose that matters, not the developer's purpose; you as a user are free to run the program for your purposes, and if you distribute it to someone else, she is then free to run it for her purposes, but you are not entitled to impose your purposes on her.
“Free software” does not mean “noncommercial”. A free program must be available for commercial use, commercial development, and commercial distribution. Commercial development of free software is no longer unusual; such free commercial software is very important. You may have paid money to get copies of free software, or you may have obtained copies at no charge. But regardless of how you got your copies, you always have the freedom to copy and change the software, even to sell copies.
Thus, free software means that computer users have the freedom to cooperate with whom they choose, and to control the software they use. To summarize this into a remark distinguishing libre (freedom) software from gratis (zero price) software, the Free Software Foundation says: "Free software is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of 'free' as in 'free speech', not as in 'free beer'".[22] See Gratis versus libre.
A report by Standish Group estimates that adoption of free software has caused a drop in revenue to the proprietary software industry by about $60 billion per year.[69] In spite of this, Eric S. Raymond argues that the term free software is too ambiguous and intimidating for the business community. Raymond promotes the term open-source software as a friendlier alternative for the business and corporate world.[70]
If you use a desktop email client like Outlook, Thunderbird, or even Windows Mail, you're probably not getting as much spam-fighting power—especially with POP3 email accounts. Stick SPAMfigher on the system—it works directly with Microsoft to make it as tough against spam as possible. (The Windows version is totally free for home use; the Mac version is only free for 10 days.)
In 1983, Richard Stallman, one of the original authors of the popular Emacs program and a longtime member of the hacker community at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, announced the GNU project, the purpose of which was to produce a completely non-proprietary Unix-compatible operating system, saying that he had become frustrated with the shift in climate surrounding the computer world and its users. In his initial declaration of the project and its purpose, he specifically cited as a motivation his opposition to being asked to agree to non-disclosure agreements and restrictive licenses which prohibited the free sharing of potentially profitable in-development software, a prohibition directly contrary to the traditional hacker ethic. Software development for the GNU operating system began in January 1984, and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was founded in October 1985. He developed a free software definition and the concept of "copyleft", designed to ensure software freedom for all. Some non-software industries are beginning to use techniques similar to those used in free software development for their research and development process; scientists, for example, are looking towards more open development processes, and hardware such as microchips are beginning to be developed with specifications released under copyleft licenses (see the OpenCores project, for instance). Creative Commons and the free culture movement have also been largely influenced by the free software movement.
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