Your local library isn't just a place you go to find a new novel without paying for it. Libraries subscribe to a number of different business directories, which makes them a perfect place to get leads for free —especially for B2B salespeople. These directories aren't limited to resources like Internet reverse lookups, although such a tool can be very useful if you're looking for business leads. Many companies make it their business to organize information about both the company and their consumers. This information is compiled into a huge database, and this database is pure gold for any salesperson looking to create a new lead list.
^ Barton P. Miller; David Koski; Cjin Pheow Lee; Vivekananda Maganty; Ravi Murthy; Ajitkumar Natarajan; Jeff Steidl (October 1995). "Fuzz Revisited: A Re-examination of the Reliability of UNIX Utilities and Services" (PDF). Madison, WI 53706-1685 USA: University of Wisconsin: Computer Sciences Department. Archived from the original (pdf) on 21 June 2010. Retrieved 1 May 2013. ...The reliability of the basic utilities from GNU and Linux were noticeably better than those of the commercial systems [sic]
Plunkett offers both print and online almanacs and other business data for a number of industries, including a special package for libraries. In addition to public companies, Plunkett Research has data on government agencies, educational institutions, and individual consumers. You can also use the online service to track industry trends and statistics.
Most of us who work in sales, spend our time educating ourselves with books, programs and coaches. We get all badass at sales and then face the ultimate problem: no one to sell to. I’ll show you nine ways you can get free leads from sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and any other social media site. Social media leads are the best leads there are. They are ready, real and easily engaged. 
Rules that “if you make your version available in this way, you must make it available in that way also” can be acceptable too, on the same condition. An example of such an acceptable rule is one saying that if you have distributed a modified version and a previous developer asks for a copy of it, you must send one. (Note that such a rule still leaves you the choice of whether to distribute your version at all.) Rules that require release of source code to the users for versions that you put into public use are also acceptable.
Mozilla's email client extraordinaire has jumped to version 45, but it still has all the features that made it great: account setup wizards, multiple languages, hundreds of add-ons, a tabbed interface, great search, junk mail and phishing tools, and the option for a personalized email address with your own choice of a domain name. Migration from previous versions is a breeze and worth it if you're on the desktop.
In 1983, Richard Stallman, one of the original authors of the popular Emacs program and a longtime member of the hacker community at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, announced the GNU project, the purpose of which was to produce a completely non-proprietary Unix-compatible operating system, saying that he had become frustrated with the shift in climate surrounding the computer world and its users. In his initial declaration of the project and its purpose, he specifically cited as a motivation his opposition to being asked to agree to non-disclosure agreements and restrictive licenses which prohibited the free sharing of potentially profitable in-development software, a prohibition directly contrary to the traditional hacker ethic. Software development for the GNU operating system began in January 1984, and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was founded in October 1985. He developed a free software definition and the concept of "copyleft", designed to ensure software freedom for all. Some non-software industries are beginning to use techniques similar to those used in free software development for their research and development process; scientists, for example, are looking towards more open development processes, and hardware such as microchips are beginning to be developed with specifications released under copyleft licenses (see the OpenCores project, for instance). Creative Commons and the free culture movement have also been largely influenced by the free software movement.

The best thing about some of these companies is that you don't have to "Like" them on Facebook, send messages on Twitter, or complete surveys. With the companies I've listed first, simply sign in, input your mailing information, and wait for the free sample to show up in your mail). It will take less than 15 minutes sign up and up to six weeks for samples to arrive.
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