Completely FREE Software is a program listing service and software library. It does not produce its own software. Like any library it does not enter into copyright disputes between authors publishers and copyright holders. It is up to the legal owner to pursue copyright infringements directly with a program’s author and/or publisher. Completely FREE Software assumes that ALL copyright issues are resolved (even when told otherwise) and that program authors have full permission to use the characters, concepts and ideas presented in their programs. Program authors and publishers can request that Completely FREE Software remove any listed program and this will be carried out as soon as possible. A program will also be removed if Completely FREE Software receives notification from a duly recognized Officer of the Court pertaining to a legal ruling which would prevent that program from being listed. However RESPONSIBILITY and LEGAL LIABILITY in the area of copyright rests solely with the program author and/or publisher and not with Completely FREE Software or its WebAuthor(s), staff or agents.
In fact, such a movement exists, and you can be part of it. The free software movement was started in 1983 by computer scientist Richard M. Stallman, when he launched a project called GNU, which stands for “GNU is Not UNIX”, to provide a replacement for the UNIX operating system—a replacement that would respect the freedoms of those using it. Then in 1985, Stallman started the Free Software Foundation, a nonprofit with the mission of advocating and educating on behalf of computer users around the world.
Often used in good faith by people who refer to what Free Software stands for, the term "Open Source" - originally defined to mean the same thing as Free Software in terms of licenses and implementation - has seen inflationary usage. Nowadays, it is regularly used for everything between Free Software and the highly proprietary "Governmental Security Program" (GSP) by Microsoft2.

LastPass is great, but LogMeOnce Password Management Suite Premium is good enough to earn its own 5-star rating. And don't let that word "premium" fool you, this software for logging in is free, albeit with some paid upgrades available for $1/month. LogMeOnce's claim to fame is to be utterly "passwordless." While you can go with a master password, the selling point is to use your smartphone (or tablet, whatever you always have with you) as an authenticator—primarily by using the fingerprint reader built into most modern smartphones (photo login is a paid feature). It's browser-based so it works the same on all desktop systems.
Free software played a significant part in the development of the Internet, the World Wide Web and the infrastructure of dot-com companies.[58][59] Free software allows users to cooperate in enhancing and refining the programs they use; free software is a pure public good rather than a private good. Companies that contribute to free software increase commercial innovation.[60]
I don’t mind doing surveys as long as I know I have to do them up front don’t email me or text me and say I won something for you giving me a free gift card or sending me something free in the mail and then you ask for my credit card or did you order for me to get anything I have to do thousands of an answer a lots of questions and their personal questions I think that is so disrespectful and sneaky and scammy and it really shouldn’t even be able to be posted on the Internet or sent to anyone on over the online.if I have to fill out surveys or anything besides give you my information where to send my free merchandise then it’s not free it’s basically a trade in order for me to get the free merchandise I have to give you my time in answering a survey questions or excetera if that’s the case just be upfront and honest and say that don’t say it there’s no strings attached and that I won something and where you sending me something free because I’ve never get it.
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