Sometimes government export control regulations and trade sanctions can constrain your freedom to distribute copies of programs internationally. Software developers do not have the power to eliminate or override these restrictions, but what they can and must do is refuse to impose them as conditions of use of the program. In this way, the restrictions will not affect activities and people outside the jurisdictions of these governments. Thus, free software licenses must not require obedience to any nontrivial export regulations as a condition of exercising any of the essential freedoms.
Content marketing seemed like a viable option only a few years ago to help businesses grow their databases. However, research shows that engagement is getting harder to keep and that a small minority of content online is responsible for the majority of social media shares. If a marketer wants to make content marketing work for their business, they need to produce exceptional content. 

As the name implies, PowToon concentrates on providing a method for animating presentations. The free version is limited to 100MB of online storage and you only get basic image resolution and five minutes per presentation, with limited access to royalty free music and styles. But that should be enough to get you started and a limitation worth working with to make a great presentation.


Too often a business will invest solely in how-to type of content. If you are a social media software company, you may invest in how-to posts as new social media tools become available. These posts can be super helpful, and a business may end up ranking high on search engine result pages (SERPs) with a how-to piece of content. The problem is that there are hundreds of businesses writing the same posts, so the pool of competition is quite large. Secondly, these posts don't age well. Snapchat might update their context cards next week, which would mean marketing teams need to update their posts with new information and new screenshots.


Got a slew of CBR and CBZ files laying around on your hard drive unread? These compressed files full of scanned-in comic book page images are easy to read with the right software. The right software is ComicRack, because it does a lot more than just display the images—it'll even share the files across your network, and provides full database organization of the comics. Use the Windows version to sync comics to the mobile apps.

Piriform's Recuva (say it out loud) is a must on the tool belt of any techie, as it'll be key to helping some wayward soul get back a lost file. It's easy to understand, though should really be installed before you lose a file for utmost effectiveness. It's portable, so you have the option to run it from a USB thumb drive (thus not overwriting that lost file on your drive by installing Recuva at the last minute.)
Foxit Reader is free for not just reading, but also creating PDFs and collaboration on the files (at least you can with the Windows version; Mac and Linux are more limited). Foxit's MobilePDF apps are on iOS, Android, and Windows Phone. What's more, they support a tech called ConnectedPDF so you can send PDF files and even update them after you send them (thanks be to the cloud).

The first formal definition of free software was published by FSF in February 1986.[21] That definition, written by Richard Stallman, is still maintained today and states that software is free software if people who receive a copy of the software have the following four freedoms.[22][23] The numbering begins with zero, not only as a spoof on the common usage of zero-based numbering in programming languages, but also because "Freedom 0" was not initially included in the list, but later added first in the list as it was considered very important.
The BSD-based operating systems, such as FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and NetBSD, do not have their own formal definitions of free software. Users of these systems generally find the same set of software to be acceptable, but sometimes see copyleft as restrictive. They generally advocate permissive free software licenses, which allow others to use the software as they wish, without being legally forced to provide the source code. Their view is that this permissive approach is more free. The Kerberos, X11, and Apache software licenses are substantially similar in intent and implementation.
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