FileHippo is a pretty solid repository of freeware and shareware apps to be found for Windows and Mac. On the Windows side, you can find updates to third-party utilites by running this utility, which replaces its old Update Checker. It compares what's available on FileHippo.com against what's installed on the PC and helps download the latest version (via FileHippo.com, of course).
Piriform's Recuva (say it out loud) is a must on the tool belt of any techie, as it'll be key to helping some wayward soul get back a lost file. It's easy to understand, though should really be installed before you lose a file for utmost effectiveness. It's portable, so you have the option to run it from a USB thumb drive (thus not overwriting that lost file on your drive by installing Recuva at the last minute.)
Vuze, which integrates torrent uploads/downloads with a media server option, comes in two flavors now. The free Leap is lightweight, has no ads, but lacks a Linux version. The regular free Vuze is ad-supported, but has lots more features like remote control via the web or mobile apps. It's nice software but watch the installations—even the Web page will itself will try to get you to install a new search engine. Twice.
Just like InfoUSA, SalesGenie is an Infogroup product. SalesGenie offers many of the same search options as InfoUSA and the data comes from the same sources. The difference between the two services is that SalesGenie is designed specifically for salespeople, while InfoUSA is designed more for marketing campaigns. SalesGenie also comes with a short free trial, so you can experiment with it even if your library doesn't subscribe.
But as for the leads you work to gain yourself through your own marketing efforts, or with the help of software to reach out to, these are called free sales leads. These leads are the ones you have found on your own, and they may or may not be successful for you. It all depends on the sales lead and your marketing tactics to convert the lead. You might not have the added reassurance of interest from the bought leads, but these raw leads can still prove to be successful.
Proprietary software uses restrictive software licences or EULAs and usually does not provide users with the source code. Users are thus legally or technically prevented from changing the software, and this results on reliance on the publisher to provide updates, help, and support. (See also vendor lock-in and abandonware). Users often may not reverse engineer, modify, or redistribute proprietary software.[15][16] Beyond copyright law, contracts and lack of source code; there could be additional shenanigans keeping users from exercising freedom over a piece of software, such as software patents and digital rights management (more specifically, tivoization).[17]
“Free software” means software that respects users' freedom and community. Roughly, it means that the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. Thus, “free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech,” not as in “free beer”. We sometimes call it “libre software,” borrowing the French or Spanish word for “free” as in freedom, to show we do not mean the software is gratis.
Free software advocates strongly believe that this methodology is biased by counting more vulnerabilities for the free software systems, since their source code is accessible and their community is more forthcoming about what problems exist,[40] (This is called "Security Through Disclosure"[41]) and proprietary software systems can have undisclosed societal drawbacks, such as disenfranchising less fortunate would-be users of free programs. As users can analyse and trace the source code, many more people with no commercial constraints can inspect the code and find bugs and loopholes than a corporation would find practicable. According to Richard Stallman, user access to the source code makes deploying free software with undesirable hidden spyware functionality far more difficult than for proprietary software.[42]

This Web- and mobile-only tool from Intuit is a must have. It's not only the spiritual replacement for the Quicken and Microsoft Money of yore, it's a modern equivalent that takes the work out of finance. By linking up securely with your various online money sources, Mint.com provides a one-stop look at all your finances. You can ignore all the offers to make you more financially solvent with new accounts and credit cards, but who knows, one day you may see a deal that works.
Vuze, which integrates torrent uploads/downloads with a media server option, comes in two flavors now. The free Leap is lightweight, has no ads, but lacks a Linux version. The regular free Vuze is ad-supported, but has lots more features like remote control via the web or mobile apps. It's nice software but watch the installations—even the Web page will itself will try to get you to install a new search engine. Twice.

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