Thus, free software means that computer users have the freedom to cooperate with whom they choose, and to control the software they use. To summarize this into a remark distinguishing libre (freedom) software from gratis (zero price) software, the Free Software Foundation says: "Free software is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of 'free' as in 'free speech', not as in 'free beer'".[22] See Gratis versus libre.

“Free software” means software that respects users' freedom and community. Roughly, it means that the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. Thus, “free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech,” not as in “free beer”. We sometimes call it “libre software,” borrowing the French or Spanish word for “free” as in freedom, to show we do not mean the software is gratis.
The Linux kernel, started by Linus Torvalds, was released as freely modifiable source code in 1991. The first licence was a proprietary software licence. However, with version 0.12 in February 1992, he relicensed the project under the GNU General Public License.[28] Much like Unix, Torvalds' kernel attracted the attention of volunteer programmers. FreeBSD and NetBSD (both derived from 386BSD) were released as free software when the USL v. BSDi lawsuit was settled out of court in 1993. OpenBSD forked from NetBSD in 1995. Also in 1995, The Apache HTTP Server, commonly referred to as Apache, was released under the Apache License 1.0.

And, we should explain publicly the reason for the change. Linus Torvalds has been saying in "World Domination 101" that the open-source culture needs to make a serious effort to take the desktop and engage the corporate mainstream. Of course he's right -- and this re-labeling, as Linus agrees, is part of the process. It says we're willing to work with and co-opt the market for our own purposes, rather than remaining stuck in a marginal, adversarial position.


Vuze, which integrates torrent uploads/downloads with a media server option, comes in two flavors now. The free Leap is lightweight, has no ads, but lacks a Linux version. The regular free Vuze is ad-supported, but has lots more features like remote control via the web or mobile apps. It's nice software but watch the installations—even the Web page will itself will try to get you to install a new search engine. Twice.
A special issue arises when a license requires changing the name by which the program will be invoked from other programs. That effectively hampers you from releasing your changed version so that it can replace the original when invoked by those other programs. This sort of requirement is acceptable only if there's a suitable aliasing facility that allows you to specify the original program's name as an alias for the modified version.
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer stated in 2001 that "open source is not available to commercial companies. The way the license is written, if you use any open-source software, you have to make the rest of your software open source."[55] This misunderstanding is based on a requirement of copyleft licenses (like the GPL) that if one distributes modified versions of software, they must release the source and use the same license. This requirement does not extend to other software from the same developer. The claim of incompatibility between commercial companies and Free Software is also a misunderstanding. There are several large companies, e.g. Red Hat and IBM, which do substantial commercial business in the development of Free Software.
Proprietary software on the other hand tends to use a different business model, where a customer of the proprietary application pays a fee for a license to legally access and use it. This license may grant the customer the ability to configure some or no parts of the software themselves. Often some level of support is included in the purchase of proprietary software, but additional support services (especially for enterprise applications) are usually available for an additional fee. Some proprietary software vendors will also customize software for a fee.[52]
From the 1950s up until the early 1970s, it was normal for computer users to have the software freedoms associated with free software, which was typically public domain software.[11] Software was commonly shared by individuals who used computers and by hardware manufacturers who welcomed the fact that people were making software that made their hardware useful. Organizations of users and suppliers, for example, SHARE, were formed to facilitate exchange of software. As software was often written in an interpreted language such as BASIC, the source code was distributed to use these programs. Software was also shared and distributed as printed source code (Type-in program) in computer magazines (like Creative Computing, SoftSide, Compute!, Byte etc) and books, like the bestseller BASIC Computer Games.[25] By the early 1970s, the picture changed: software costs were dramatically increasing, a growing software industry was competing with the hardware manufacturer's bundled software products (free in that the cost was included in the hardware cost), leased machines required software support while providing no revenue for software, and some customers able to better meet their own needs did not want the costs of "free" software bundled with hardware product costs. In United States vs. IBM, filed January 17, 1969, the government charged that bundled software was anti-competitive.[26] While some software might always be free, there would henceforth be a growing amount of software produced primarily for sale. In the 1970s and early 1980s, the software industry began using technical measures (such as only distributing binary copies of computer programs) to prevent computer users from being able to study or adapt the software applications as they saw fit. In 1980, copyright law was extended to computer programs.
The freedom to redistribute copies must include binary or executable forms of the program, as well as source code, for both modified and unmodified versions. (Distributing programs in runnable form is necessary for conveniently installable free operating systems.) It is OK if there is no way to produce a binary or executable form for a certain program (since some languages don't support that feature), but you must have the freedom to redistribute such forms should you find or develop a way to make them.

If you’re in a jam, and you need leads quickly, I don’t know of a better source than social media. I got kicked off Facebook for 30 days and I’ve been closing sales from Instagram and LinkedIn like I never missed a beat. Social media is the new age way of networking for prospects. If you’re not using social media and you want more training on how to crush social media selling, sign up at www.breakfreeacademy.com/entourage
Certain kinds of rules about the manner of distributing free software are acceptable, when they don't conflict with the central freedoms. For example, copyleft (very simply stated) is the rule that when redistributing the program, you cannot add restrictions to deny other people the central freedoms. This rule does not conflict with the central freedoms; rather it protects them.
Got image files of entire disks you would like to read, but don't want to over-write your existing drives or go buy a bunch of blank DVDs just to read the files? This software lets you mount the image (ISO, BIN, or CCD format) with a double click, as if it was a readable drive all by itself. In fact, you can load up to eight virtual drives simultaneously.
Notes created in this simple but powerful app are automatically stored online (you need a Simplenote account to use it). Multiple versions of notes are saved when changes are made, in case you need an old copy. It supports markdown for formatting text a little better, but best of all works with a lot of top-flight downloadable desktop note-taking tools like ResophNotes for Windows and Notational Velocity for the Mac.
Microsoft is no longer supporting this software, but it still works if you download it from a third-party site. If you've got basic video-editing needs on the desktop, and want a fun way to man-handle all the clips into a final form, then you're set. (If you fear outdated software, try Microsoft's Movie Moments, for 60-second productions. Or wait for the long-promised Windows 10 version of Movie Maker, but who knows when that's coming.)
Usually referred to as SEO (Search Engine Optimisation); tools such as SEMrush, Moz, Raven, and Ahrefs help you achieve a strong organic ranking in search engines. This isn’t an approach due to lots of competition, and it can take some time before you achieve any real exciting results. Using a combination of competitive and long tail keywords, you can increase your website traffic as well as increase conversions on your website. Google Analytics can be used to monitor how your traffic levels are doing.
Comodo does much more than the built-in option in Windows. As it should, it blocks attacks from outside, and it has a malware detector that's better than some antivirus systems. It also installs the Comodo Dragon hardened security web browser. (Be careful during install, though; nice as it is, it may try to change your browser home page and search engine defaults.)
Got a slew of CBR and CBZ files laying around on your hard drive unread? These compressed files full of scanned-in comic book page images are easy to read with the right software. The right software is ComicRack, because it does a lot more than just display the images—it'll even share the files across your network, and provides full database organization of the comics. Use the Windows version to sync comics to the mobile apps.
Marketers should implement passive lead generation tactics in addition to regular marketing activities to help hit their lead goals. The methods detailed above should not completely replace time-intensive lead generation work. A marketing team should implement a variety of lead generation efforts. This kind of flexibility will ensure they produce a steady source of leads even as marketing trends shift.
Certain kinds of rules about the manner of distributing free software are acceptable, when they don't conflict with the central freedoms. For example, copyleft (very simply stated) is the rule that when redistributing the program, you cannot add restrictions to deny other people the central freedoms. This rule does not conflict with the central freedoms; rather it protects them.

The BSD-based operating systems, such as FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and NetBSD, do not have their own formal definitions of free software. Users of these systems generally find the same set of software to be acceptable, but sometimes see copyleft as restrictive. They generally advocate permissive free software licenses, which allow others to use the software as they wish, without being legally forced to provide the source code. Their view is that this permissive approach is more free. The Kerberos, X11, and Apache software licenses are substantially similar in intent and implementation.
This is the original call to the community to start using the term ‘open source‘ that I issued on 8 February 1998. The event referred to in the first paragraph is the 23 January announcement of the Mozilla source code release. Because this is a historic document, I have fixed some link drift but haven't re-styled it to match the rest of my site. Though it has been converted to XHTML rather than HTML classic, except for this gray box and the RCS date at the bottom it looks pretty much exactly as it did then. There are Spanish and Indonesian translations of this document.

Your local library isn't just a place you go to find a new novel without paying for it. Libraries subscribe to a number of different business directories, which makes them a perfect place to get leads for free —especially for B2B salespeople. These directories aren't limited to resources like Internet reverse lookups, although such a tool can be very useful if you're looking for business leads. Many companies make it their business to organize information about both the company and their consumers. This information is compiled into a huge database, and this database is pure gold for any salesperson looking to create a new lead list.
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