The economic viability of free software has been recognized by large corporations such as IBM, Red Hat, and Sun Microsystems.[63][64][65][66][67] Many companies whose core business is not in the IT sector choose free software for their Internet information and sales sites, due to the lower initial capital investment and ability to freely customize the application packages. Most companies in the software business include free software in their commercial products if the licenses allow that.[18]

Apart from these two organizations, the Debian project is seen by some to provide useful advice on whether particular licenses comply with their Debian Free Software Guidelines. Debian doesn't publish a list of approved licenses, so its judgments have to be tracked by checking what software they have allowed into their software archives. That is summarized at the Debian web site.[32]
The expansion of online marketing with regards to promotional giveaways has facilitated the rise of "Freebie sites" that seek to aggregate all promotional free sample offers in one place. These sites will often compile free product samples from all over the World Wide Web and categorize them by type. Some product sample offers may require consumers to complete a survey or refer a friend in order to qualify for the freebies. When all requirements are fulfilled, the product samples are shipped to the consumer. Some sample products might be digital goods, where sample might be closely related to a product trial.
^ Waring, Teresa; Maddocks, Philip (1 October 2005). "Open Source Software implementation in the UK public sector: Evidence from the field and implications for the future". International Journal of Information Management. 25 (5): 411–428. doi:10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2005.06.002. In addition OSS’s development process is creating innovative products that are reliable, secure, practical and have high usability and performance ratings. Users are now not only benefiting from the OSS revolution but also from the improved proprietary software development that is being forced upon suppliers in order to maintain competitive advantage.
Put the PrtScn (Print Screen) button to actual use. LightShot is a tiny utility that takes over that button. Push it and you can pick what part of the screen to turn into a screenshot, plus annotate with tools like text and arrows. It's also available for leading web browsers to capture what's on a page. Once captured, you get choices to save to a file, the clipboard, the cloud, social networks, or to just search for similar shots in Google.
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer stated in 2001 that "open source is not available to commercial companies. The way the license is written, if you use any open-source software, you have to make the rest of your software open source."[55] This misunderstanding is based on a requirement of copyleft licenses (like the GPL) that if one distributes modified versions of software, they must release the source and use the same license. This requirement does not extend to other software from the same developer. The claim of incompatibility between commercial companies and Free Software is also a misunderstanding. There are several large companies, e.g. Red Hat and IBM, which do substantial commercial business in the development of Free Software.
The FSF also notes that "Open Source" has exactly one specific meaning in common English, namely that "you can look at the source code." It states that while the term "Free Software" can lead to two different interpretations, at least one of them is consistent with the intended meaning unlike the term "Open Source".[a] The loan adjective "libre" is often used to avoid the ambiguity of the word "free" in English language, and the ambiguity with the older usage of "free software" as public domain software.[11] See Gratis versus libre.
Eventually in this life, you're going to run into an archive file—a single file with multiple files stored (and compressed) inside it. They have different extensions, from RAR to ZIP to 7z and many more, and sometimes the program to open them costs you. Not 7-Zip. It opens all of those and more, and allows creation of new archives. It'll even encrypt the contents for safety. It's entirely open source.
Piriform's Recuva (say it out loud) is a must on the tool belt of any techie, as it'll be key to helping some wayward soul get back a lost file. It's easy to understand, though should really be installed before you lose a file for utmost effectiveness. It's portable, so you have the option to run it from a USB thumb drive (thus not overwriting that lost file on your drive by installing Recuva at the last minute.)
Although the term free software had already been used loosely in the past,[11] Richard Stallman is credited with tying it to the sense under discussion and starting the free-software movement in 1983, when he launched the GNU Project: a collaborative effort to create a freedom-respecting operating system, and to revive the spirit of cooperation once prevalent among hackers during the early days of computing.[12][13]

The Opera browser has been keeping up with the big boys for years, and it does so now by incorporating features no other browser has, in particular a built-in VPN service to keep your browsing secure, as well as ad blockers, a turbo mode, and even a battery saver that lets your laptop run longer than other browsers accessing the same content. It also comes in multiple versions for mobile, including Opera Mini, which compresses pages before you even load them.


I wholeheartedly agree with #2!! I never realized how much of an impact dirty carpets could have on the work place. My company recently switched to professionals who specialize in commercial dry carpet cleaning and it has made such an impact on the environment we work in. Definitely something to look into! They have some awesome information on their site. https://www.chemdrysantaclaritavalley.com/commercial-carpet-cleaning/
A report by Standish Group estimates that adoption of free software has caused a drop in revenue to the proprietary software industry by about $60 billion per year.[69] In spite of this, Eric S. Raymond argues that the term free software is too ambiguous and intimidating for the business community. Raymond promotes the term open-source software as a friendlier alternative for the business and corporate world.[70]
Since free software may be freely redistributed, it is generally available at little or no fee. Free software business models are usually based on adding value such as customization, accompanying hardware, support, training, integration, or certification.[18] Exceptions exist however, where the user is charged to obtain a copy of the free application itself.[51]

PCMag's top pick for software to take control of other computers is TeamViewer. Almost everything you need is free: desktop sharing, file transfers, even chat with remote users. And the setup couldn't be easier. Take control of a PC over a Web connection and a Chrome browser (even in ChromeOS) with the TeamViewer extension. There is also a Windows app in the Microsoft Store and optional downloads to make installing TeamViewer on multiple PCs even easier—though it's only free for personal use.
Freeflys: Another strong contender in the freebies space, Freeflys has appeared on NBC’s Today Show, The Doctors, Fox News and a handful of other media outlets. Similar to most of these sites, Freeflys utilizes email alerts to tell users about free-sample offers as they happen. The site also allows you to search for a specific product with the handy search bar.
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