Currently, many people use proprietary software that denies users these freedoms and benefits. If we make a copy and give it to a friend, if we try to figure out how the program works, if we put a copy on more than one of our own computers in our own home, we could be caught and fined or put in jail. That’s what’s in the fine print of the license agreement you accept when using proprietary software.

In 1983, Richard Stallman, one of the original authors of the popular Emacs program and a longtime member of the hacker community at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, announced the GNU project, the purpose of which was to produce a completely non-proprietary Unix-compatible operating system, saying that he had become frustrated with the shift in climate surrounding the computer world and its users. In his initial declaration of the project and its purpose, he specifically cited as a motivation his opposition to being asked to agree to non-disclosure agreements and restrictive licenses which prohibited the free sharing of potentially profitable in-development software, a prohibition directly contrary to the traditional hacker ethic. Software development for the GNU operating system began in January 1984, and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was founded in October 1985. He developed a free software definition and the concept of "copyleft", designed to ensure software freedom for all. Some non-software industries are beginning to use techniques similar to those used in free software development for their research and development process; scientists, for example, are looking towards more open development processes, and hardware such as microchips are beginning to be developed with specifications released under copyleft licenses (see the OpenCores project, for instance). Creative Commons and the free culture movement have also been largely influenced by the free software movement.


Placing legal or practical restrictions on the comprehension or modification of a program, such as mandatory purchase of special licenses, signing of a Non-Disclosure-Agreement (NDA) or - for programming languages that have multiple forms or representation - making the preferred human way of comprehending and editing a program ("source code") inaccessible also makes it proprietary (non-free). Without the freedom to modify a program, people will remain at the mercy of a single vendor.

While most hard-copy business directories are located in the Reference section of the public library, you should still ask your Reference librarian which databases they carry and where to find them. If your local library doesn't have the directory you need, then place a request with the librarian because very often the librarian will be able to subscribe to the source you're looking for. Many libraries have computers set up so that patrons like you can go online if you prefer the electronic version. That said, not all of these databases have been converted to e-versions. 


At first glance, appear.in looks a lot like GoToMeeting. That's because both of them use the fledgling open-source standard called WebRTC (real time communication) to set up and connect users for video conferencing in modern browsers (Chrome, Firefox, and Opera, specifically). There are a whole slew of companies trying it, with names like Talky, imo, and Gruveo—there's even a Web RTC feature built into the Firefox browser. Appear.in outdoes them all. It has mobile apps, allows up to eight conference attendees, screen sharing, claims on customizable "rooms," and even just simple chat tools. You can even stick an appear.in room on your website.
Scroll down the page and look for the "Fit-Flex Underwear for Women" offer and access the "Get a free sample" link and fill out the form to request a sample of this product, which offers "classic underwear-style protection with a range of sizes to fit your body." You can receive your choice of either a small/medium or large/extra large underwear sample. (U.S. only).
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