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Consider OneDrive the most flexible and all-encompassing sync and back-up tool going. It's the official cloud storage for users of Microsoft Office and Windows 10 (it's built right into the OS). OneDrive throws in 5GB of free online storage; you earn extra by referring friends or backing up smartphone cameras. If you subscribe to Office 365 Home, that storage jumps up to 1TB.
In 1983, Richard Stallman, one of the original authors of the popular Emacs program and a longtime member of the hacker community at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, announced the GNU project, the purpose of which was to produce a completely non-proprietary Unix-compatible operating system, saying that he had become frustrated with the shift in climate surrounding the computer world and its users. In his initial declaration of the project and its purpose, he specifically cited as a motivation his opposition to being asked to agree to non-disclosure agreements and restrictive licenses which prohibited the free sharing of potentially profitable in-development software, a prohibition directly contrary to the traditional hacker ethic. Software development for the GNU operating system began in January 1984, and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was founded in October 1985. He developed a free software definition and the concept of "copyleft", designed to ensure software freedom for all. Some non-software industries are beginning to use techniques similar to those used in free software development for their research and development process; scientists, for example, are looking towards more open development processes, and hardware such as microchips are beginning to be developed with specifications released under copyleft licenses (see the OpenCores project, for instance). Creative Commons and the free culture movement have also been largely influenced by the free software movement.
From the 1950s up until the early 1970s, it was normal for computer users to have the software freedoms associated with free software, which was typically public domain software.[11] Software was commonly shared by individuals who used computers and by hardware manufacturers who welcomed the fact that people were making software that made their hardware useful. Organizations of users and suppliers, for example, SHARE, were formed to facilitate exchange of software. As software was often written in an interpreted language such as BASIC, the source code was distributed to use these programs. Software was also shared and distributed as printed source code (Type-in program) in computer magazines (like Creative Computing, SoftSide, Compute!, Byte etc) and books, like the bestseller BASIC Computer Games.[25] By the early 1970s, the picture changed: software costs were dramatically increasing, a growing software industry was competing with the hardware manufacturer's bundled software products (free in that the cost was included in the hardware cost), leased machines required software support while providing no revenue for software, and some customers able to better meet their own needs did not want the costs of "free" software bundled with hardware product costs. In United States vs. IBM, filed January 17, 1969, the government charged that bundled software was anti-competitive.[26] While some software might always be free, there would henceforth be a growing amount of software produced primarily for sale. In the 1970s and early 1980s, the software industry began using technical measures (such as only distributing binary copies of computer programs) to prevent computer users from being able to study or adapt the software applications as they saw fit. In 1980, copyright law was extended to computer programs.
Google built Hangouts into its services as a replacement for the Google Talk messaging service, but Hangouts adds voice and video calls. It's unique for this roundup in that it doesn't require an installer, it just works in your browser (though getting the Chrome Extension is recommended). It's perfect for talking to other people on Google—you can get up to nine people in a video chat, all for free.

I don’t mind doing surveys as long as I know I have to do them up front don’t email me or text me and say I won something for you giving me a free gift card or sending me something free in the mail and then you ask for my credit card or did you order for me to get anything I have to do thousands of an answer a lots of questions and their personal questions I think that is so disrespectful and sneaky and scammy and it really shouldn’t even be able to be posted on the Internet or sent to anyone on over the online.if I have to fill out surveys or anything besides give you my information where to send my free merchandise then it’s not free it’s basically a trade in order for me to get the free merchandise I have to give you my time in answering a survey questions or excetera if that’s the case just be upfront and honest and say that don’t say it there’s no strings attached and that I won something and where you sending me something free because I’ve never get it.

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