The Opera browser has been keeping up with the big boys for years, and it does so now by incorporating features no other browser has, in particular a built-in VPN service to keep your browsing secure, as well as ad blockers, a turbo mode, and even a battery saver that lets your laptop run longer than other browsers accessing the same content. It also comes in multiple versions for mobile, including Opera Mini, which compresses pages before you even load them.
Apart from these two organizations, the Debian project is seen by some to provide useful advice on whether particular licenses comply with their Debian Free Software Guidelines. Debian doesn't publish a list of approved licenses, so its judgments have to be tracked by checking what software they have allowed into their software archives. That is summarized at the Debian web site.[32]

Facebook Messenger is built right into the interface on Facebook on the Web, so you can use it without doing anything special. But downloading the mobile clients or using the dedicated Web interface at Messenger.com opens up lots of other options, from voice and video calls, to SMS texting support, to use of stickers, to, perhaps the best part, chatbots that will talk to you and provide info. Like its brother, WhatsApp, it also has a billion users.
This could be the most high-end free software ever: it's the very tool used to render the images you see in Pixar's movies. That's because RenderMan was developed by Pixar in-house for that purpose, but became free for non-commercial use. It's not going to do you much good without other software such as Autodesk's Maya for creating 3D models. But budding artists and filmmakers will want to take note. You'll need a 64-bit system to run it.

Facebook Messenger is built right into the interface on Facebook on the Web, so you can use it without doing anything special. But downloading the mobile clients or using the dedicated Web interface at Messenger.com opens up lots of other options, from voice and video calls, to SMS texting support, to use of stickers, to, perhaps the best part, chatbots that will talk to you and provide info. Like its brother, WhatsApp, it also has a billion users.

If you don't know or care what a media server is—you just want to stream your videos and music collection around the house—Plex is probably for you. Install it on all your devices, point it at some media, and the media is available on all of them—even remotely over the internet. Plex plans to implement a cloud-based server option on Dropbox, Google Drive, and OneDrive, so you can stream from the Web.


The thing with buying leads is that they likely come from a list put together of candidates that may or may not have an interest in similar businesses and services. These bought leads are not guarantees, and some of them might have interest in related products, but will not be suitable for your business. So when you work to convert these leads, you will have no such luck. But when you find a lead organically and work to convert them, you know they have found your business and they are actually interested because they sought you out, and not the other way around. This fact alone will bring you more luck in the conversion process.
Permissive licenses, also called BSD-style because they are applied to much of the software distributed with the BSD operating systems: these licenses are also known as copyfree as they have no restrictions on distribution.[34] The author retains copyright solely to disclaim warranty and require proper attribution of modified works, and permits redistribution and any modification, even closed-source ones. In this sense, a permissive license provides an incentive to create non-free software, by reducing the cost of developing restricted software. Since this is incompatible with the spirit of software freedom, many people consider permissive licenses to be less free than copyleft licenses.
Many people write their own license. This is frowned upon as writing a license that does what you want involves subtle issues. Too often the wording used is either ambiguous or people create conditions that conflict with each other. Writing a license that would hold up in court is even harder. Luckily, there are a number of licenses already written that probably do what you want.

This re-labeling has since attracted a lot of support (and some opposition) in the hacker culture. Supporters include Linus himself, John "maddog" Hall, Larry Augustin, Bruce Perens of Debian, Phil Hughes of Linux Journal. Opposers include Richard Stallman, who initially flirted with the idea but now thinks the term "open source" isn't pure enough.
Sometimes government export control regulations and trade sanctions can constrain your freedom to distribute copies of programs internationally. Software developers do not have the power to eliminate or override these restrictions, but what they can and must do is refuse to impose them as conditions of use of the program. In this way, the restrictions will not affect activities and people outside the jurisdictions of these governments. Thus, free software licenses must not require obedience to any nontrivial export regulations as a condition of exercising any of the essential freedoms.
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Second, the term makes a lot of corporate types nervous. While this does not intrinsically bother me in the least, we now have a pragmatic interest in converting these people rather than thumbing our noses at them. There's now a chance we can make serious gains in the mainstream business world without compromising our ideals and commitment to technical excellence -- so it's time to reposition. We need a new and better label.
The obvious choice of Office tools if you are a firm believer in open source, LibreOffice was a fork from the original OpenOffice years ago (itself an offshoot of StarOffice). Inside are word processor, spreadsheet, and presentations programs, a vector graphics editor, a math formula editor, and a database. It's a little more awkward to use than the desktop version of Microsoft Office, but you can't beat the price. Grab the LibreOffice Viewer app for Android to look at files. 

Rules that “if you make your version available in this way, you must make it available in that way also” can be acceptable too, on the same condition. An example of such an acceptable rule is one saying that if you have distributed a modified version and a previous developer asks for a copy of it, you must send one. (Note that such a rule still leaves you the choice of whether to distribute your version at all.) Rules that require release of source code to the users for versions that you put into public use are also acceptable.
Piriform's Recuva (say it out loud) is a must on the tool belt of any techie, as it'll be key to helping some wayward soul get back a lost file. It's easy to understand, though should really be installed before you lose a file for utmost effectiveness. It's portable, so you have the option to run it from a USB thumb drive (thus not overwriting that lost file on your drive by installing Recuva at the last minute.)
After a big cross-platform upgrade, the much-loved VLC got even more awesome. Already a premier way to watch just about any video, ever, no matter what the weird codec, the latest has features like auto-rotating smartphone videos taken at the wrong orientation, and resuming playback from where you stopped. Seriously, it plays back anything, and guarantees it comes with now ads, tracking, or spyware.

At first glance, this looks like Dropbox or OneDrive, but Resilio Sync (formerly BitTorrent Sync) skips one aspect—it syncs file between computers without the files ever hitting a server on the Internet for online storage. This is purely peer-to-peer syncing, and works great with large files. For free, you get syncing between two devices but with unlimited data.

If you don't know or care what a media server is—you just want to stream your videos and music collection around the house—Plex is probably for you. Install it on all your devices, point it at some media, and the media is available on all of them—even remotely over the internet. Plex plans to implement a cloud-based server option on Dropbox, Google Drive, and OneDrive, so you can stream from the Web.
Your local library isn't just a place you go to find a new novel without paying for it. Libraries subscribe to a number of different business directories, which makes them a perfect place to get leads for free —especially for B2B salespeople. These directories aren't limited to resources like Internet reverse lookups, although such a tool can be very useful if you're looking for business leads. Many companies make it their business to organize information about both the company and their consumers. This information is compiled into a huge database, and this database is pure gold for any salesperson looking to create a new lead list.
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