Completely FREE Software is a program listing service and software library. It does not produce its own software. Like any library it does not enter into copyright disputes between authors publishers and copyright holders. It is up to the legal owner to pursue copyright infringements directly with a program’s author and/or publisher. Completely FREE Software assumes that ALL copyright issues are resolved (even when told otherwise) and that program authors have full permission to use the characters, concepts and ideas presented in their programs. Program authors and publishers can request that Completely FREE Software remove any listed program and this will be carried out as soon as possible. A program will also be removed if Completely FREE Software receives notification from a duly recognized Officer of the Court pertaining to a legal ruling which would prevent that program from being listed. However RESPONSIBILITY and LEGAL LIABILITY in the area of copyright rests solely with the program author and/or publisher and not with Completely FREE Software or its WebAuthor(s), staff or agents.

With 10GB of free online storage, Box's Personal service now is one of the more robust free offerings. Box also limits file sizes to 250MB each. It does more than sync and have online access; it also offers tools for commenting on or editing documents (it won't replace an office suite like Google Drive, which you'll find below in Office Suites, though it could just as easily go in this category).
The opposite of file recovery is utter destruction—the kind of thing you do to keep a file out of someone else's hands. Eraser does just that, writing over the spot where the file(s) lived until it's scrubbed clean, with no chance of coming back to haunt you. You can even use it to schedule a wipe of the free space on the disk, or just to purge your recycle bin. During setup you get the option to install an extension for Windows Explorer so you can wipe files or free space instantly.
On February 3rd 1998, in the wake of Netscapes announcement to release their browser as Free Software, a group of people met in Palo Alto in the Silicon Valley and proposed to start a marketing campaign for Free Software using the term ``Open Source.'' The goal was to seek fast commercialisation of Free Software and acceptance of Free Software by the companies and venture capitalists of the booming new economy. As a means to this end, they made a conscious decision to leave aside all long-term issues (such as philosophy, ethics and social effects) related to Free Software, feeling these posed obstacles in the way of rapid acceptance by economy. They proposed to focus on technical advantages only1.
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The first of a few Piriform programs on this list, CCleaner—the first C is for Crap!—is one of the best, and pretty much essential for keeping a system going. What it does is simple: it cleans up extraneous files to keep a system running better. Get it and run it, regularly. It'll even delete some apps you didn't think you could get rid of—like those provided in Windows 10, whether you wanted them or not.

Although both definitions refer to almost equivalent corpora of programs, the Free Software Foundation recommends using the term "free software" rather than "open-source software" (a younger vision coined in 1998), because the goals and messaging are quite dissimilar. "Open source" and its associated campaign mostly focus on the technicalities of the public development model and marketing free software to businesses, while taking the ethical issue of user rights very lightly or even antagonistically.[19] Stallman has also stated that considering the practical advantages of free software is like considering the practical advantages of not being handcuffed, in that it is not necessary for an individual to consider practical reasons in order to realize that being handcuffed is undesirable in itself.[20]


These freedoms are rights, not obligations, although respecting these freedoms for society may at times oblige the individual. Any person can choose to not make use of them, but may also choose to make use of all of them. In particular, it should be understood that Free Software does not exclude commercial use. If a program fails to allow commercial use and commercial distribution, it is not Free Software. Indeed a growing number of companies base their business model completely or at least partially on Free Software, including some of the largest proprietary software vendors. Free Software makes it legal to provide help and assistance, it does not make it mandatory.
Sometimes government export control regulations and trade sanctions can constrain your freedom to distribute copies of programs internationally. Software developers do not have the power to eliminate or override these restrictions, but what they can and must do is refuse to impose them as conditions of use of the program. In this way, the restrictions will not affect activities and people outside the jurisdictions of these governments. Thus, free software licenses must not require obedience to any nontrivial export regulations as a condition of exercising any of the essential freedoms.
In 2006, OpenBSD started the first campaign against the use of binary blobs in kernels. Blobs are usually freely distributable device drivers for hardware from vendors that do not reveal driver source code to users or developers. This restricts the users' freedom effectively to modify the software and distribute modified versions. Also, since the blobs are undocumented and may have bugs, they pose a security risk to any operating system whose kernel includes them. The proclaimed aim of the campaign against blobs is to collect hardware documentation that allows developers to write free software drivers for that hardware, ultimately enabling all free operating systems to become or remain blob-free.
I don’t mind doing surveys as long as I know I have to do them up front don’t email me or text me and say I won something for you giving me a free gift card or sending me something free in the mail and then you ask for my credit card or did you order for me to get anything I have to do thousands of an answer a lots of questions and their personal questions I think that is so disrespectful and sneaky and scammy and it really shouldn’t even be able to be posted on the Internet or sent to anyone on over the online.if I have to fill out surveys or anything besides give you my information where to send my free merchandise then it’s not free it’s basically a trade in order for me to get the free merchandise I have to give you my time in answering a survey questions or excetera if that’s the case just be upfront and honest and say that don’t say it there’s no strings attached and that I won something and where you sending me something free because I’ve never get it.
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