Speed development of system and IoT device applications, boost performance and power efficiency, and strengthen system reliability with this easy-to-use, comprehensive, cross-platform tool suite. Includes optimizing compilers, highly tuned libraries, analyzers, debug tools, and advanced cloud connectors, as well as provides access to over 400 sensors. Get started with a free 90-day renewable commercial license.
Gale is an e-research tool offered by Cengage Learning. It's designed mainly for schools and educational research, but can be quite helpful in generating sales lead lists as well. Gale publishes over 600 databases, both in hard copy and online. These databases include both business information and collections of articles on various subjects. The article lists are particularly useful when you're collecting lists of publications related to your industry.
At first glance, this looks like Dropbox or OneDrive, but Resilio Sync (formerly BitTorrent Sync) skips one aspect—it syncs file between computers without the files ever hitting a server on the Internet for online storage. This is purely peer-to-peer syncing, and works great with large files. For free, you get syncing between two devices but with unlimited data.
I wholeheartedly agree with #2!! I never realized how much of an impact dirty carpets could have on the work place. My company recently switched to professionals who specialize in commercial dry carpet cleaning and it has made such an impact on the environment we work in. Definitely something to look into! They have some awesome information on their site. https://www.chemdrysantaclaritavalley.com/commercial-carpet-cleaning/
With 10GB of free online storage, Box's Personal service now is one of the more robust free offerings. Box also limits file sizes to 250MB each. It does more than sync and have online access; it also offers tools for commenting on or editing documents (it won't replace an office suite like Google Drive, which you'll find below in Office Suites, though it could just as easily go in this category).

From the 1950s up until the early 1970s, it was normal for computer users to have the software freedoms associated with free software, which was typically public domain software.[11] Software was commonly shared by individuals who used computers and by hardware manufacturers who welcomed the fact that people were making software that made their hardware useful. Organizations of users and suppliers, for example, SHARE, were formed to facilitate exchange of software. As software was often written in an interpreted language such as BASIC, the source code was distributed to use these programs. Software was also shared and distributed as printed source code (Type-in program) in computer magazines (like Creative Computing, SoftSide, Compute!, Byte etc) and books, like the bestseller BASIC Computer Games.[25] By the early 1970s, the picture changed: software costs were dramatically increasing, a growing software industry was competing with the hardware manufacturer's bundled software products (free in that the cost was included in the hardware cost), leased machines required software support while providing no revenue for software, and some customers able to better meet their own needs did not want the costs of "free" software bundled with hardware product costs. In United States vs. IBM, filed January 17, 1969, the government charged that bundled software was anti-competitive.[26] While some software might always be free, there would henceforth be a growing amount of software produced primarily for sale. In the 1970s and early 1980s, the software industry began using technical measures (such as only distributing binary copies of computer programs) to prevent computer users from being able to study or adapt the software applications as they saw fit. In 1980, copyright law was extended to computer programs.

This is the original call to the community to start using the term ‘open source‘ that I issued on 8 February 1998. The event referred to in the first paragraph is the 23 January announcement of the Mozilla source code release. Because this is a historic document, I have fixed some link drift but haven't re-styled it to match the rest of my site. Though it has been converted to XHTML rather than HTML classic, except for this gray box and the RCS date at the bottom it looks pretty much exactly as it did then. There are Spanish and Indonesian translations of this document.


After a big cross-platform upgrade, the much-loved VLC got even more awesome. Already a premier way to watch just about any video, ever, no matter what the weird codec, the latest has features like auto-rotating smartphone videos taken at the wrong orientation, and resuming playback from where you stopped. Seriously, it plays back anything, and guarantees it comes with now ads, tracking, or spyware.
The FSF list is not prescriptive: free licenses can exist that the FSF has not heard about, or considered important enough to write about. So it's possible for a license to be free and not in the FSF list. The OSI list only lists licenses that have been submitted, considered and approved. All open-source licenses must meet the Open Source Definition in order to be officially recognized as open source software. Free software on the other hand is a more informal classification that does not rely on official recognition. Nevertheless, software licensed under licenses that do not meet the Free Software Definition cannot rightly be considered free software.
Would you like to design labels right on your screen without installing software? Then what you need is HERMA LabelAssistant online (EAO). Choose from more than 100 different templates. Or design your labels from scratch, with your own images, logos and graphics. Integrate Excel spreadsheets for mail merge. Or use EAO to generate barcodes and serial numbers. This is the state of the art in label design.

GIMP has a very different interface from Photoshop, and some people scratch their heads over its workflow. But generally speaking, GIMP is a lot simpler to use. It’s also free to download, and the software is regularly updated. GIMP has come along way since its clunky inception, and more and more Photoshop users are making the switch, or even cutting their teeth with this zero-cost alternative.

This is the original call to the community to start using the term ‘open source‘ that I issued on 8 February 1998. The event referred to in the first paragraph is the 23 January announcement of the Mozilla source code release. Because this is a historic document, I have fixed some link drift but haven't re-styled it to match the rest of my site. Though it has been converted to XHTML rather than HTML classic, except for this gray box and the RCS date at the bottom it looks pretty much exactly as it did then. There are Spanish and Indonesian translations of this document.
Plunkett offers both print and online almanacs and other business data for a number of industries, including a special package for libraries. In addition to public companies, Plunkett Research has data on government agencies, educational institutions, and individual consumers. You can also use the online service to track industry trends and statistics.
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