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Free software advocates strongly believe that this methodology is biased by counting more vulnerabilities for the free software systems, since their source code is accessible and their community is more forthcoming about what problems exist,[40] (This is called "Security Through Disclosure"[41]) and proprietary software systems can have undisclosed societal drawbacks, such as disenfranchising less fortunate would-be users of free programs. As users can analyse and trace the source code, many more people with no commercial constraints can inspect the code and find bugs and loopholes than a corporation would find practicable. According to Richard Stallman, user access to the source code makes deploying free software with undesirable hidden spyware functionality far more difficult than for proprietary software.[42]
This re-labeling has since attracted a lot of support (and some opposition) in the hacker culture. Supporters include Linus himself, John "maddog" Hall, Larry Augustin, Bruce Perens of Debian, Phil Hughes of Linux Journal. Opposers include Richard Stallman, who initially flirted with the idea but now thinks the term "open source" isn't pure enough.
Finally, note that criteria such as those stated in this free software definition require careful thought for their interpretation. To decide whether a specific software license qualifies as a free software license, we judge it based on these criteria to determine whether it fits their spirit as well as the precise words. If a license includes unconscionable restrictions, we reject it, even if we did not anticipate the issue in these criteria. Sometimes a license requirement raises an issue that calls for extensive thought, including discussions with a lawyer, before we can decide if the requirement is acceptable. When we reach a conclusion about a new issue, we often update these criteria to make it easier to see why certain licenses do or don't qualify.

Adobe created the PDF format, so it stands to reason it would still offer a pretty kick-ass free PDF reader, albeit one that's not as full-featured as some others, since it has other tools it wants to sell you. (The DC stands for Document Cloud, Adobe's attempt to get you to store everything online via Adobe.) Using it, you can easily annotate or sign PDFs, fill out forms, or even save a PDF to Word or TXT format.
Help Scout is a company that wants to rank for customer acquisition. Check out their pillar content on customer acquisition. Not only is the page very helpful for anyone interested in this topic, but because Help Scout links to a bunch of other sites, they are setting the page up to receive backlinks from those other sites. Marketers should think outside normal content creation practices and create a pillar piece of curated content.
Proprietary software uses restrictive software licences or EULAs and usually does not provide users with the source code. Users are thus legally or technically prevented from changing the software, and this results on reliance on the publisher to provide updates, help, and support. (See also vendor lock-in and abandonware). Users often may not reverse engineer, modify, or redistribute proprietary software.[15][16] Beyond copyright law, contracts and lack of source code; there could be additional shenanigans keeping users from exercising freedom over a piece of software, such as software patents and digital rights management (more specifically, tivoization).[17]
Distribution of source code. One of the problems with most proprietary software is that you can't fix bugs or customize it since the source code is not available. Also, the company may decide to stop supporting the hardware you use. Many free licenses force the distribution of the source code. This protects the user by allowing them to customize the software for their needs.

Google Drive has morphed over the years to become the official place where you store your cloud files for use with Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides (Drive's online and mobile equivalents to Word, Excel, and PowerPoint). But it also doubles as a sync service on the desktop, a la Dropbox or OneDrive, storing any kind of file, with apps for access to those same files on mobile devices. Throw in the office suite aspects and the 15GB of free space online (shared with other Google services), and you've got a real winner, worthy of a 5-star rating.
Got a slew of CBR and CBZ files laying around on your hard drive unread? These compressed files full of scanned-in comic book page images are easy to read with the right software. The right software is ComicRack, because it does a lot more than just display the images—it'll even share the files across your network, and provides full database organization of the comics. Use the Windows version to sync comics to the mobile apps.
Printing to a printer locally can be a hassle sometimes. Over a network it doesn't get better, and over the Internet? Get ready to tear your hair out at the roots and use the blood as ink—it's faster. Unless you've got PrinterShare installed. Put the software on a PC connected to a printer (or on the network with one), set up an account, and then any PC should be able to see the printer(s). You can even print right from the Web. Sadly, the mobile versions are premium only.

Your freelance website should be more than just a glorified portfolio and contact information. Every page on it should be optimized to help your leads convert. Use your words wisely by highlighting the value of your services on the site. Include prominent calls-to-action encouraging site visitors to join your mailing list, set up a consultation, or make a purchase.
I have this belief. I’ve run my entire business on this one belief. I believe that everyone can be a good salesperson if they can find the right thing to sell and the right people to sell to. Selling is actually the easy part of our job, but we spend 99 percent of our time prospecting and not selling. Getting quality leads isn’t easy. Salespeople who can generate their own leads can write their own paychecks. For as much as they want.
Free software or libre software[1][2] is computer software distributed under terms that allow users to run the software for any purpose as well as to study, change, and distribute it and any adapted versions.[3][4][5][6][7] Free software is a matter of liberty, not price: users—individually or in cooperation with computer programmers—are free to do what they want with their copies of a free software (including profiting from them) regardless of how much is paid to obtain the program.[8][2] Computer programs are deemed free insofar as they give users (not just the developer) ultimate control over the first, thereby allowing them to control what their devices are programmed to do.[5][9]
You don’t need to spend hundreds or thousands on expensive advertisements to get your business noticed on the web. A much more powerful option is leveraging word-of-mouth. Encourage other people (your friends, family, clients, business associates) to talk about your business online and recommend it to others. News will spread about your freelance services much more effectively.

Mozilla's email client extraordinaire has jumped to version 45, but it still has all the features that made it great: account setup wizards, multiple languages, hundreds of add-ons, a tabbed interface, great search, junk mail and phishing tools, and the option for a personalized email address with your own choice of a domain name. Migration from previous versions is a breeze and worth it if you're on the desktop.
Something to always watch for: crapware installers. To make ends meet, many creators of otherwise great free software, or the services that offer the programs for download, bundle in things you don't want. Worse, the installation routine obfuscates the steps, so you provide the unwanted program tacit permission to be installed. For more about how to spot and avoid this problem, see How to Clean Crapware From a New PC, and check out the Uninstaller section of this very free software collection.
The economic viability of free software has been recognized by large corporations such as IBM, Red Hat, and Sun Microsystems.[63][64][65][66][67] Many companies whose core business is not in the IT sector choose free software for their Internet information and sales sites, due to the lower initial capital investment and ability to freely customize the application packages. Most companies in the software business include free software in their commercial products if the licenses allow that.[18]
^ Jump up to: a b c Shea, Tom (1983-06-23). "Free software - Free software is a junkyard of software spare parts". InfoWorld. Retrieved 2016-02-10. "In contrast to commercial software is a large and growing body of free software that exists in the public domain. Public-domain software is written by microcomputer hobbyists (also known as "hackers") many of whom are professional programmers in their work life. [...] Since everybody has access to source code, many routines have not only been used but dramatically improved by other programmers."
Speed development of system and IoT device applications, boost performance and power efficiency, and strengthen system reliability with this easy-to-use, comprehensive, cross-platform tool suite. Includes optimizing compilers, highly tuned libraries, analyzers, debug tools, and advanced cloud connectors, as well as provides access to over 400 sensors. Get started with a free 90-day renewable commercial license.

In 1983, Richard Stallman, longtime member of the hacker community at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, announced the GNU project, saying that he had become frustrated with the effects of the change in culture of the computer industry and its users.[27] Software development for the GNU operating system began in January 1984, and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was founded in October 1985. An article outlining the project and its goals was published in March 1985 titled the GNU Manifesto. The manifesto included significant explanation of the GNU philosophy, Free Software Definition and "copyleft" ideas.
Most of us who work in sales, spend our time educating ourselves with books, programs and coaches. We get all badass at sales and then face the ultimate problem: no one to sell to. I’ll show you nine ways you can get free leads from sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and any other social media site. Social media leads are the best leads there are. They are ready, real and easily engaged. 
Gale is an e-research tool offered by Cengage Learning. It's designed mainly for schools and educational research, but can be quite helpful in generating sales lead lists as well. Gale publishes over 600 databases, both in hard copy and online. These databases include both business information and collections of articles on various subjects. The article lists are particularly useful when you're collecting lists of publications related to your industry.
In 1983, Richard Stallman, one of the original authors of the popular Emacs program and a longtime member of the hacker community at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, announced the GNU project, the purpose of which was to produce a completely non-proprietary Unix-compatible operating system, saying that he had become frustrated with the shift in climate surrounding the computer world and its users. In his initial declaration of the project and its purpose, he specifically cited as a motivation his opposition to being asked to agree to non-disclosure agreements and restrictive licenses which prohibited the free sharing of potentially profitable in-development software, a prohibition directly contrary to the traditional hacker ethic. Software development for the GNU operating system began in January 1984, and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was founded in October 1985. He developed a free software definition and the concept of "copyleft", designed to ensure software freedom for all. Some non-software industries are beginning to use techniques similar to those used in free software development for their research and development process; scientists, for example, are looking towards more open development processes, and hardware such as microchips are beginning to be developed with specifications released under copyleft licenses (see the OpenCores project, for instance). Creative Commons and the free culture movement have also been largely influenced by the free software movement.

Imagine not having the hassle of Windows, but still being able to run (most) Windows programs? That's the goal with ReactOS, which builds on the old Windows NT architecture as an open source operating system. And it only takes a 150MB to install it, so it's small. You can grab it as a full installer, or make a LiveCD version that boots off a disc to give it a try.
Microsoft is no longer supporting this software, but it still works if you download it from a third-party site. If you've got basic video-editing needs on the desktop, and want a fun way to man-handle all the clips into a final form, then you're set. (If you fear outdated software, try Microsoft's Movie Moments, for 60-second productions. Or wait for the long-promised Windows 10 version of Movie Maker, but who knows when that's coming.)
In 2006, OpenBSD started the first campaign against the use of binary blobs in kernels. Blobs are usually freely distributable device drivers for hardware from vendors that do not reveal driver source code to users or developers. This restricts the users' freedom effectively to modify the software and distribute modified versions. Also, since the blobs are undocumented and may have bugs, they pose a security risk to any operating system whose kernel includes them. The proclaimed aim of the campaign against blobs is to collect hardware documentation that allows developers to write free software drivers for that hardware, ultimately enabling all free operating systems to become or remain blob-free.
“Free software” does not mean “noncommercial”. A free program must be available for commercial use, commercial development, and commercial distribution. Commercial development of free software is no longer unusual; such free commercial software is very important. You may have paid money to get copies of free software, or you may have obtained copies at no charge. But regardless of how you got your copies, you always have the freedom to copy and change the software, even to sell copies.
The fastest way to create a PDF file is to make it in something you're comfortable with, be it a word processor or otherwise, then print the file out as a PDF. PDFCreator sets itself up as a printer on your system, so when you go to make a "print," you select it and out shoots a PDF to your PC. PDFs with this free tool can be secured, signed, and are automatically saved. The creators at PDFForge promise it will be free forever.
Got a slew of CBR and CBZ files laying around on your hard drive unread? These compressed files full of scanned-in comic book page images are easy to read with the right software. The right software is ComicRack, because it does a lot more than just display the images—it'll even share the files across your network, and provides full database organization of the comics. Use the Windows version to sync comics to the mobile apps.

In fact, such a movement exists, and you can be part of it. The free software movement was started in 1983 by computer scientist Richard M. Stallman, when he launched a project called GNU, which stands for “GNU is Not UNIX”, to provide a replacement for the UNIX operating system—a replacement that would respect the freedoms of those using it. Then in 1985, Stallman started the Free Software Foundation, a nonprofit with the mission of advocating and educating on behalf of computer users around the world.
In 2006, OpenBSD started the first campaign against the use of binary blobs in kernels. Blobs are usually freely distributable device drivers for hardware from vendors that do not reveal driver source code to users or developers. This restricts the users' freedom effectively to modify the software and distribute modified versions. Also, since the blobs are undocumented and may have bugs, they pose a security risk to any operating system whose kernel includes them. The proclaimed aim of the campaign against blobs is to collect hardware documentation that allows developers to write free software drivers for that hardware, ultimately enabling all free operating systems to become or remain blob-free.

In this program governments and intergovernmental organisations pay substantial fees for a superficial look at some parts of Windows sourcecode in special Microsoft facilities. This may increase "perceived security" but is essentially useless - especially since they do not even know whether what they looked at is what they have on their computers. And of course it does not give them freedom.
With 10GB of free online storage, Box's Personal service now is one of the more robust free offerings. Box also limits file sizes to 250MB each. It does more than sync and have online access; it also offers tools for commenting on or editing documents (it won't replace an office suite like Google Drive, which you'll find below in Office Suites, though it could just as easily go in this category).
Help Scout is a company that wants to rank for customer acquisition. Check out their pillar content on customer acquisition. Not only is the page very helpful for anyone interested in this topic, but because Help Scout links to a bunch of other sites, they are setting the page up to receive backlinks from those other sites. Marketers should think outside normal content creation practices and create a pillar piece of curated content.
This company offers full-size, awesome samples. The only trick is that they only give away products at a certain time of the day. I have "won" a couple of samples by following one very important rule: fill out all of your information, answer all of the questions, and at the exact time the contest begins, hit "submit". Every second counts! To see promotional cosmetics samples Allure has to offer, visit their website. Some examples of previously available samples include:
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