Permissive licenses, also called BSD-style because they are applied to much of the software distributed with the BSD operating systems: these licenses are also known as copyfree as they have no restrictions on distribution.[34] The author retains copyright solely to disclaim warranty and require proper attribution of modified works, and permits redistribution and any modification, even closed-source ones. In this sense, a permissive license provides an incentive to create non-free software, by reducing the cost of developing restricted software. Since this is incompatible with the spirit of software freedom, many people consider permissive licenses to be less free than copyleft licenses.

In 2006, OpenBSD started the first campaign against the use of binary blobs in kernels. Blobs are usually freely distributable device drivers for hardware from vendors that do not reveal driver source code to users or developers. This restricts the users' freedom effectively to modify the software and distribute modified versions. Also, since the blobs are undocumented and may have bugs, they pose a security risk to any operating system whose kernel includes them. The proclaimed aim of the campaign against blobs is to collect hardware documentation that allows developers to write free software drivers for that hardware, ultimately enabling all free operating systems to become or remain blob-free.


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Vuze, which integrates torrent uploads/downloads with a media server option, comes in two flavors now. The free Leap is lightweight, has no ads, but lacks a Linux version. The regular free Vuze is ad-supported, but has lots more features like remote control via the web or mobile apps. It's nice software but watch the installations—even the Web page will itself will try to get you to install a new search engine. Twice.

One of the new class of messaging services with an ecosystems of apps, Telegram delivers not only easy communications, but also encryption security end-to-end. It's a stand-out on iPhone, and has native apps on just about every platform available. Send messages, files, photos, animated GIFs (the search is built in), and create channels of up to 5,000 people to broadcast to.

You can only get so much reach on social media by sharing interesting posts and following new people. If you want to really get noticed, you’ll need the help of influencers. Influencers are popular profiles on social media who can share your content with their audience. Find powerful ones and encourage them to share your blog posts and other content to get more reach.
As the name implies, PowToon concentrates on providing a method for animating presentations. The free version is limited to 100MB of online storage and you only get basic image resolution and five minutes per presentation, with limited access to royalty free music and styles. But that should be enough to get you started and a limitation worth working with to make a great presentation.
It's not going to outpace the paid anti-malware tools for effectiveness, but the easy-to-use Panda is more than capable of keeping up with the freebies. It will even automatically check USB drives you insert and launch a "vaccination" against launched processes on the USB drive. Just watch out during Panda installation as it tries to reset some of your defaults—the price you pay for "free."

In 1983, Richard Stallman, longtime member of the hacker community at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, announced the GNU project, saying that he had become frustrated with the effects of the change in culture of the computer industry and its users.[27] Software development for the GNU operating system began in January 1984, and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was founded in October 1985. An article outlining the project and its goals was published in March 1985 titled the GNU Manifesto. The manifesto included significant explanation of the GNU philosophy, Free Software Definition and "copyleft" ideas.
These Kindle Ebooks can be read on the Kindle, but also you can read Kindle ebooks on your Personal Computer, Mac, IPhone, Android, Blackberry, iPad, Windows 7 Phone, etc. with the FREE Kindle Application Here. Click here to see a bunch more FREE Kindle Ebook Downloads! Be sure when you add the Kindle to your cart that it is $0.00 as these prices do change frequently. Also the books that say (FREE with Prime) are only Free for Amazon Prime members.
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